sustainable-activewear

How to find sustainable activewear from smaller companies

sustainable-activewear

Depending on where you live, spring flowers are blooming and summer may be just around the corner. Wherever you are, by now you have probably grown tired of your New Year’s resolution exercise routine and the workout gear you have been wearing day after day (or even year after year). Even the best-intentioned resolutions and highest-quality workout gear won’t last forever.

Eventually armpit stains triumph over your favorite shirts, downward dogs wear your yoga pants thin and the miles you’ve logged force your favorite running shoes to surrender.

Maybe you don’t even need new gear, but just the thought of some new clothes inspires you to want to run to your local coffee shop instead of drive, or to continue cycle to work once a week. So while the most sustainable choice is always to wear the clothes you already have for as long as possible, when you need (or desperately want) some new workout gear, your best bet is to make thoughtful purchases that are sustainably and responsibly sourced.

What makes this difficult is that activewear has a pretty poor sustainability track record. With cancer-causing ingredients, water-guzzling cotton production and unsafe working conditions and low wages for textile workers plaguing the industry, it may seem impossible to find sustainably produced activewear. But guess what? It’s not.

There ARE companies out there making responsible activewear, and it’s not just from the big names like Patagonia (though they should be applauded for their work as pioneers in this field). But sometimes you just want to support the little guy.

In the blog post I wrote for 2degrees network, “Beyond Patagonia: How smaller brands are winning the sustainable activewear game” I share some of the great smaller brands I have discovered, as well as some resources for how you can find more companies like them. Take a look and let me know what you think!

I know I only named a few, so tell me: What are some of your favorite smaller, sustainable activewear brands?